Fun Facts

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Check out these fun facts about women, engineers, and cool engineering achievements.

  • Egirl   Team Posted on September 5, 2012 by Egirl Team
    Bobsleigh Runs
    There are less than 20 bobsleigh tracks in the entire world approved by the sport's international governing organization. The 2002 Olympic track in Park City, Utah, is the southernmost track in the world and is designed for bobsleigh, luge and skeleton events. The $25 million bobsleigh track of Park City, Utah is the most challenging sports track of its time.
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    Resource Added: September 5, 2012

    Latest Update: September 5, 2012

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  • Egirl   Team Posted on July 3, 2012 by Egirl Team
    Emily Roebling
    A woman named Emily Roebling supervised construction of the Brooklyn Bridge. When her husband became ill in 1872 Emily took over day-to-day supervision of bridge construction. Emily had studied many engineering topics related to bridge construction including mathematics, strength of materials, and cable construction. Her name is included on the plaque dedicating the bridge - recognizing her role in creating one of her era's great engineering achievements.
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    Resource Added: July 3, 2012

    Latest Update: September 5, 2012

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  • Egirl   Team Posted on May 11, 2012 by Egirl Team
    Ferris Wheel
    Did you know the Ferris Wheel is considered an engineering wonder? The Ferris Wheel was designed by George W. Ferris in 1893. It was designed to be the landmark of the World's Fair in Chicago in 1893. The wheel is supported by two 140-foot steel towers. The towers are connected by a 45-foot axle, making the axle the largest single piece of forged steel made at that time.
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    Resource Added: May 11, 2012

    Latest Update: September 21, 2012

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  • Egirl   Team Posted on May 11, 2012 by Egirl Team
    Crystal Bridge
    In Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, the Crystal Bridge Conservatory is the focus of the Myriad Botanical Gardens. Engineers designed a cloud-making system to provide the necessary environment for a rainforest. A path next to a 35-foot waterfall leads up a "mountain" of rock formations, which are really latex molds from actual rock outcroppings. The conservatory is made from over 3,000 acrylic panels. It is seven stories tall and 224 feet long.
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    Resource Added: May 11, 2012

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  • Egirl   Team Posted on May 11, 2012 by Egirl Team
    Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel
    The Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel was considered to be "One of Seven Engineering Wonders of the Modern World."
    The Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel opened as a two-lane highway in 1964. Thirty-five years later in 1999, the southbound side opened, making it a four-lane highway. The 20-mile road connects Southeastern Virginia to the Delmarva Peninsula and cuts 95 miles from the trip between Virginia Beach, Virginia and points north of WIlmington, Delaware. It is made of two high bridges, two, one-mile tunnels, four man-made islands, and 12 miles of trestle. Each island is 10 acres in size and has almost 1.2 million tons of rock armor. The 12 miles of trestle are supported by more than 5000 concrete piles.  Although it is no longer on the American Society of Civil Engineers list of Engineering Wonders, it was chosen as One of Seven Engineering Wonders of the Modern World when it was built in 1964 due to the number and different types of major structures included in one ...
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    Resource Added: May 11, 2012

    Latest Update: September 5, 2012

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  • Egirl   Team Posted on April 10, 2012 by Egirl Team
    Alaskan Pipeline
    The Trans-Alaska Pipeline System was the largest private construction project of its time. The pipeline is 800 miles long and has a diameter of four feet. The zigzagging pipeline carries crude oil from 250 miles north of the Arctic Circle to the terminal at Valdez.
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    Resource Added: April 10, 2012

    Latest Update: September 21, 2012

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  • Egirl   Team Posted on March 27, 2012 by Egirl Team
    Galveston Seawall
    On September 8, 1900, a hurricane sent an 8-foot high wave crashing into the city of Galveston, Texas. This hurricane killed 6,000-8,000 people and is considered to be the worst natural disaster in U.S. history. After the hurricane, the city asked retired Army engineer Henry Robert to design a seawall that would be seven miles long and seventeen feet high. Robert designed the wall as asked and also raised the city by pumping sand underneath the buildings. In 1915, the seawall was tested by another hurricane. This time, all but 8 people survived.
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    Resource Added: March 27, 2012

    Latest Update: September 21, 2012

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  • Simil  Raghavan Posted on March 27, 2012 by Simil Raghavan
    Hoover Dam
    The Hoover Dam is one of the tallest concrete dams ever built and it created one of the largest manmade lakes in the United States. At 726.4 feet tall, it took 200 engineers from several consulting firms and the Bureau of Reclamation to design the dam. It has 3,125,000 cubic yards of concrete and weighs more than 6.6 million tons! Construction of the dam, power plant, and related works took five years to build and was finished two years ahead of schedule. The reservoir created can hold enough water to cover the entire state of Pennsylvania with water one foot deep.
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    Resource Added: March 27, 2012

    Latest Update: September 6, 2012

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  • Egirl   Team Posted on March 27, 2012 by Egirl Team
    Millennium Force Roller Coaster
    When it opened in May 2000, Millennium Force broke or helped to break twelve world records. The Millennium Force Roller Coaster at Cedar Point in Sandusky, Ohio was an engineering marvel at the time it was built, and it still continues to dazzle amusement park visitors. Not only was it the fastest but also the world's largest and tallest steel roller coaster at the time. It was the first coaster to use an elevator cable system to get it up the first hill, and it used a magnetic braking system instead of friction. At 310 feet, it was the first coaster to top 300 feet, and it travels at speeds up to 92 miles per hour! The coaster has 226 footers, which contain 9400 yards of concrete. The best thing about the coaster is that it takes riders up at a 45 degree angle and they go down at an 80 degree angle - almost straight down!
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    Resource Added: March 27, 2012

    Latest Update: September 5, 2012

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  • Egirl   Team Posted on March 27, 2012 by Egirl Team
    Mormon Tabernacle
    The Mormon Tabernacle in Salt Lake City, Utah is an amazing engineering and acoustic accomplishment. The Mormon Tabernacle's unique shape is so acoustically sensitive that a pin dropped in the pulpit can be clearly heard at the back of the hall - 170 feet away! The 150-foot-wide domed roof was created by using steam to bend the wood planks, which were then lashed together with rawhide thongs and wooden pegs.
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    Resource Added: March 27, 2012

    Latest Update: September 5, 2012

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  • Egirl   Team Posted on March 27, 2012 by Egirl Team
    On the Road...
    There are enough roads in the U.S. to stretch from the earth to the moon 8 times! The U.S. interstate system has a total length of over 46,000 miles, but that is only a small fraction of the total number of roads in the country. Transportation engineers have helped to build almost 4 million miles of road in the United States. That's enough to stretch from the earth to the moon 8 times. And the concrete used to construct the Interstate System alone could build a wall nine feet thick and 50 feet high around the world’s equator.
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    Resource Added: March 27, 2012

    Latest Update: September 5, 2012

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  • Egirl   Team Posted on March 27, 2012 by Egirl Team
    Robert's Rules of Order
    Military engineer Henry Martyn Robert authored the best known and most widely used book on parliamentary law - Robert's Rules of Order. Robert served as an engineer in the army from 1867 to 1871. He worked on the defense of Washington, Philadelphia, and the New England Coast during the Civil War and was president of the Board of Engineers from 1895 to 1901. After having difficulty leading a meeting at church one day he declared that he would learn about parliamentary procedure before going back. That resulted in the Pocket Manual of Rules of Order for Deliberative Assemblies loosely based on the procedures used in the US House of Representatives.
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    Resource Added: March 27, 2012

    Latest Update: September 5, 2012

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